Book Review: To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before

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Title: To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before (first of a trilogy)

Author: Jenny Han

Blurb: To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is the story of Lara Jean, who has never openly admitted her crushes, but instead wrote each boy a letter about how she felt, sealed it, and hid it in a box under her bed. But one day Lara Jean discovers that somehow her secret box of letters has been mailed, causing all her crushes from her past to confront her about the letters: her first kiss, the boy from summer camp, even her sister’s ex-boyfriend, Josh. As she learns to deal with her past loves face to face, Lara Jean discovers that something good may come out of these letters after all.

jenny han

Review:  To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before was on my TBR list for quite a while. Unfortunately—or fortunately?—the movie adaptation came out on Netflix and I couldn’t resist all the gushing reviews, so I—GASP!—watched the movie first. Let’s just say the book immediately jumped the queue on my reading list and was just as enjoyable as the flick. You’ll cheer Lara Jean on from start to finish, swoon over Peter Kavinsky, and crave a bite of every cookie Lara Jean bakes. The story is charming and will give you all the warm and fuzzies as it takes you back to your first crush and first love.

Netflix's "To All the Boys I've Loved Before" Los Angeles Special Screening

Characters/Voice: What’s not to like about Lara Jean? She is such a compelling, likeable, and relatable narrator…someone you’d want to be friends with. You’ll adore the two other Song girls—Margot and Kitty—too. Even as secondary characters, they shine with their own backstories, motivations, and insecurities. Margot, Lara Jean, and Kitty’s sisterly love will have you wanting to be one of the Song girls as well. And then there’s Peter. And Josh. You’ll be fans of them, too.

Pacing: This is one of those books you can easily settle into a comfy spot and finish in one or two sittings. You’ll keep flipping the pages to find out what happens with Lara Jean and her letters next. 

Plot: The plot is wonderfully executed. The idea of writing secret love letters that are suddenly mailed is irresistible, especially as the consequences ensue and Lara Jean has to juggle all the new complications in her life. The story ends at a point where you’re satisfied, but also giddy with the knowledge that there’s more left to the story—two books, in fact!

Setting: Of all the places described, you’ll want to curl up on the couch in the Covey household and let the scent of freshly baked cookies wash over you as you witness the hilarity, drama, and heartache the Song girls experience together.
Themes: This story deals with relatable themes like the value of family, friendships, and telling the truth even when it’s difficult.

Now onto books 2 and 3: P.S. I Still Love you and Always and Forever, Lara Jean!

Jessica Jade

Jessica, signing off.

 

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Book Review: Legendary by Stephanie Garber

Legendary cover

Title: Legendary

Author: Stephanie Garber

Blurb:

A heart to protect. A debt to repay. A game to win.

After being swept up in the magical world of Caraval, Donatella Dragna has finally escaped her father and saved her sister Scarlett from a disastrous arranged marriage. The girls should be celebrating, but Tella isn’t yet free. She made a desperate bargain with a mysterious criminal, and what Tella owes him no one has ever been able to deliver: Caraval Master Legend’s true name. Continue reading

Book Review: Caraval by Stephanie Garber

Caraval book cover

Title: Caraval 

Author: Stephanie Garber

Blurb:

Scarlett has never left the tiny island where she and her beloved sister, Tella, live with their powerful, and cruel, father. Now Scarlett’s father has arranged a marriage for her, and Scarlett thinks her dreams of seeing Caraval, the far-away, once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show, are over. Continue reading

Book Review: Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman

StarfishTitle: Starfish (standalone)

Author:Akemi Dawn Bowman

Blurb: Kiko Himura has always had a hard time saying exactly what she’s thinking. With a mother who makes her feel unremarkable and a half-Japanese heritage she doesn’t quite understand, Kiko prefers to keep her head down, certain that once she makes it into her dream art school, Prism, her real life will begin. Continue reading

Book Review: The Story Peddler by Lindsay A. Franklin

The Story Peddler Cover resized

Title: The Story Peddler, The Weaver Trilogy Book One

Author: Lindsay A. Franklin

Review by: Jennifer Lindsay

Blurb: Tanwen doesn’t just tell stories—she weaves them into crystallized sculptures that sell for more than a few bits. But the only way to escape the control of her cruel mentor and claw her way from poverty is to set her sights on something grander: becoming Royal Storyteller to the king.

During her final story peddling tour, a tale of treason spills from her hands, threatening the king himself. Tanwen goes from peddler to prey as the king’s guard hunts her down . . . and they’re not known for their mercy. As Tanwen flees for her life, she unearths long-buried secrets and discovers she’s not the only outlaw in the empire. There’s a rebel group of weavers . . . and they’re after her too.

Continue reading

Book Review: The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness

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Title: The Knife of Never Letting Go

Author: Patrick Ness

Review by: SP Teen Writer Noah Dingman

Blurb: Todd Hewitt lives in the last surviving colony on New Earth, Prentisstown. Prentisstown isn’t like other towns. Everyone can hear everyone else’s thoughts in a constant, overwhelming Noise. There is no privacy. There are no secrets. Then Todd Hewitt unexpectedly stumbles on a spot of complete silence. Which is impossible.

Moreover, all the women in Prentisstown have been killed off by a virus in a war with the planets natives, and the men have to live with the side effect, called the Noise.

Todd is the last boy in Prentisstown and with his thirteenth birthday fast approaching, the day he becomes a man, he discovers a strange absence of the noise in a nearby swamp. He also discovers a girl. And now he’s going to have to run…

Review: As soon as I read the first sentence in the Knife of Never Letting Go I was hooked. This book picks you up and doesn’t let go. It begs you to lock yourself in your room and read it cover to cover; you will stay up to late reading this book. The Knife of Never Letting Go takes you on a fast-paced adventure similar to other YA books like The Hunger Games, but never once feels derivative or unoriginal.

Characters/Voice: The main character Todd, whose eyes and thoughts the story is told through, is very likable and real. Although you might not always agree with the decisions he makes, you can’t help but root for him and his talking dog Manchee. Todd tells you the story as it is happening to him, in that way you get to experience the action and surprises as he does. Todds voice simultaneously tells you the story and helps you get an idea of what it would be like to constantly have your thoughts projected around you in the Noise. I don’t want to give too much away, but this book has fantastic villains. By fantastic I mean the kind of villains that make your hairs stand on end and give you the shivers. It’s great.

Pacing: As I said earlier, this book is a page turner. Once you’re in, don’t expect to put it down anytime soon. Patrick Ness has crafted a unique voice and story that pulls you in and leaves you hungry for the resolution.

Plot: The plot sends Todd and Manchee on a journey through New Earth. Like lots of YA books it is very plot driven, but a lot of the book is driven by the character interactions as well. The plot is never predictable and in that way,  there isn’t really a dull moment.

Setting: Patrick Ness’s world building is great. You can clearly picture New Earth through the descriptions given. It feels a lot like the world we live it, but anytime you come across a difference it’s intriguing and well-integrated.

Themes: The Knife of Letting Go deals with many different themes, a few that stuck out to me were manipulation, guilt, and coming of age. The coming of age part is different in this book than most other YA books as it is a coming of age story in a world that is still “coming of age”. Exactly what coming of age means in Prentisstown is different from what it means here, so Todd has to figure out if he should even come of age.

Patrick Ness has written a book that I think anyone who likes YA books (or likes reading as far as I am concerned) should pick up. I guarantee by the time you finish reading The Knife of Never Letting Go you’ll be running to the nearest library, bookstore, or booting up your Amazon app to get your hands on the second book.

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Noah, signing off.

Book Review: Love, Hate, and Other Filters by Samira Ahmed

Love hateBook Review: Love, Hate & Other Filters

Title: Love, Hate & Other Filters (standalone)

Author: Samira Ahmed

Blurb: A searing #OwnVoices coming-of-age debut in which an Indian-American Muslim teen confronts Islamophobia and a reality she can neither explain nor escape–perfect for fans of Angie Thomas, Jacqueline Woodson, and Adam Silvera.

American-born seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz is torn between worlds. There’s the proper one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter: attending a college close to their suburban Chicago home, and being paired off with an older Muslim boy her mom deems “suitable.” And then there is the world of her dreams: going to film school and living in New York City—and maybe (just maybe) pursuing a boy she’s known from afar since grade school, a boy who’s finally falling into her orbit at school.

There’s also the real world, beyond Maya’s control. In the aftermath of a horrific crime perpetrated hundreds of miles away, her life is turned upside down. The community she’s known since birth becomes unrecognizable; neighbors and classmates alike are consumed with fear, bigotry, and hatred. Ultimately, Maya must find the strength within to determine where she truly belongs.   Continue reading

Book Review: Before Beauty

BEFORE BEAUTY

Title: Before Beauty (First Book in the Trilogy)

Author: Brittany Fichter

Blurb: Prince Everard’s father spent the boy’s youth forging the prince into a warrior. Upon the king’s death, however, Everard realizes he’s lost himself somewhere along the way, and in his pain, makes a decision that brings a dark curse upon both him and the great Fortress that has so long guarded the people of Destin. Continue reading

Book Review: The Epic Crush of Genie Lo

Title: The Epic Crush of Genie Lo51SrZbzYagL._SY346_.jpg

Author: F.C. Yee

Blurb: The struggle to get into a top-tier college consumes sixteen-year-old Genie’s every waking thought. But when she discovers she’s a celestial spirit who’s powerful enough to bash through the gates of heaven with her fists, her perfectionist existence is shattered.

Enter Quentin, a transfer student from China whose tone-deaf assertiveness beguiles Genie to the brink of madness. Quentin nurtures Genie’s outrageous transformation—sometimes gently, sometimes aggressively—as her sleepy suburb in the Bay Area comes under siege from hell-spawn. Continue reading

Book Review: When Dimple Met Rishi

When Dimple Met Rishi

Title: When Dimple Met Rishi

Author:  Sandhya Menon

Blurb:  Dimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she’s more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma’s inexplicable obsession with her finding the “Ideal Indian Husband.” Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn’t have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers…right?

Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him—wherein he’ll have to woo her—he’s totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself.

The Shahs and Patels didn’t mean to start turning the wheels on this “suggested arrangement” so early in their children’s lives, but when they noticed them both gravitate toward the same summer program, they figured, Why not?

Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works hard to prove itself in the most unexpected ways.

Review:

I was super excited to pick up When Dimple Met Rishi because a) I’m a second generation American who grew up in a house of two cultures; b) I’m a devourer of languages and culture besides my own (Bollywood fan here); c) I adore own voices books that represent my wide ranging diverse friends; d) I’m a sucker for slow-burning, friendship building, love stories. This story brings all of those out in a sweet, contemporary, American, fun setting, kind of way.

On plot: The book starts out with a simple premise, and we all kind of know what is coming, but Menon does a great job at sucking us into their story. There is not a ton of conflict but we still find ourselves getting attached to her characters.

On character: First Dimple. She is a strong girl with her own opinions and dreams and plans. We sympathize with her right away when her parents plan this outrageously hidden agenda for her first ever independence from her parents at a dream summer program. We want her to be the one to make her own choices, especially about love and school. (And I LOVE her name–it makes me laugh.)

Second Rishi. He was a breath of fresh air for me. He was not the typical YA boy who acted cool or knew what to say. Actually, he was the opposite, which made him feel so real. He didn’t always know what to say, but was kind-hearted and genuinely cared for people, his parents, and Dimple. And since he cares so darn much, we like him instantly!

On VOICE & DUAL POV: Lately, I have really loved DUAL POV books. Done right, they can build even more tension and sympathy, and Menon does this well. I enjoyed both Rishi and Dimples voices and narratives and felt they were both unique and relatable.

On Themes: I enjoyed learning about different cultures and traditions, the topic of arranged marriage in America, and pursuing risky dreams (Rishi and his graphic novels).

On pace: It wasn’t a fast page turning novel for me, but I didn’t feel it needed to be for the story being told. It was building friendship, slowly but surely. And then the end came perfectly together.

So, if you are looking for an adorably chill, end-of-the-summer contemporary read, snatch it up.

author-nova-mcbee

Nova, signing off.